Latest Book Reviews

That Special Feeling… Is More Complicated Than You Think

Aaron Katzman gets in touch with his (and everyone else's) emotions.

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When Planets Go Rogue

Criseyda Martinez goes on an intragalactic field trip.

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What We Talk About When We Talk About Death

What will your family do with you when you die? "Modern Death" gives Anastasia-Maria Zavitsanou a new perspective.

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When America Met Darwin

Darwin's "On the Origin of Species" arrived in an America poised for civil war. Angelika Manhart explores its impact.

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Wee Are Family

A microbial history of the world enchants Margret Veltman.

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This Scientific Life

Our contributors hail from all over the sciences — and all over the world. We’ll share what brought us to science, why we stay, and what makes us (occasionally) want to run away. There will be eureka moments, scientific screw-ups, advice to youngsters, peers, and elders, as well as whimsical stories about space exploration, fruit fly cognition, and how a neuron can live its best life.

Diseases of the Will

Social (Media) Mania

By Diego Reinero

A contagious disease afflicts contemporary scientists. At best, it plagues productivity. At worst, it harms the fabric of our community. A form of social mania was identified as early as the 1700’s when gentleman scientists left their lab coats collecting dust and occupied themselves instead with pub banter. A newly mutated strain – sparked by […]

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Standard Deviations

Confessions of an Eclipse Hater

By Sophia Domokos

I hate eclipses. OK, no. I’m eclipse indifferent — which to the countless aficionados hoofing it to Casper, WY next week, is probably worse. Hotel rooms in Carbondale, IL, Clayton, GA, and other towns in the swath of eclipse totality have been sold out for years. In the rest of the country, where the Moon […]

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Diseases of the Will

The Wall-Hoppers

By Chris Vaiana

People who suffer this variety of scientific schizophrenia are fueled by the notion that modern-day research must breach the borders that traditionally separate each discipline. Those affected by this illness claim that the walls surrounding chemistry, biology, and physics must be torn down to allow for a new breed of nomadic researcher, who will traverse […]

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I knew I wanted to be a scientist when…

Flying to Dharavi

By Indrani Chatterjee

I was born and bred in the big Indian metropolis, Bombay, in a middle-class home where a good education was valued more than anything else. My parents said I could be whatever I wanted, which is a rare thing for Indian parents (perhaps all parents). Still, it did not stop my father from reading Marx […]

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The sincerest form of flattery

Dollars, posters, planes

By Friederike Schüür

I grew up between church steeples in a city that peaked in the Middle Ages. The Hanseatic League. If you came from where I come from, you would know what it meant. I had been on planes to hop from European city to European city, ascend-descend-there-you-are without movie entertainment. Congratulations, your abstract has been accepted […]

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I knew I wanted to be a scientist when…

How to Tame Infinity

By Angelika Manhart

  I first knew I wanted to be a mathematician when Jenny and I started taking illegal shortcuts. Jenny was my best friend in primary school. Every day we’d walk home from school together. Me, short and blond-haired with two pigtails sticking out right and left, her with a red ribbon in her thick, black […]

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